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Thursday, October 18
 

TBA

Thursday at The Graduate Center, Concourse Level, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, 10016
All of Thursdays events will be at The Graduate Center, located at 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, 10016. You will need to go through security on the first floor, and go down to the concourse level where our registration crew will help orient you to the conference. 

Thursday October 18, 2018 TBA
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

9:00am

Breakfast & Registration
Thursday October 18, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

9:45am

Welcoming Remarks & Keynote: Dr. Lourdes Dolores Follins
Like many in the United States, Dr. Lourdes Dolores Follins has had a number of careers over the past 25 years. However, her work has always been guided by a mantra she learned as a teen: Meliora (Latin: Always better). At this stage of her life, Lourdes Dolores is a psychotherapist, writer, and a Yoruba/Lukumi priest. Born and raised in New York City, she earned her M.S.W. and Ph. D. in Clinical Social Work from New York University. Lourdes Dolores has worked with and advocated for marginalized children, adolescents, and adults for over 25 years in a variety of settings—including CUNY.

Before entering the academy in 2004, Lourdes Dolores worked as a clinical social worker and an organizational consultant for 13 years. During the 14 years that she taught at Kingsborough Community College, she conducted a federally-funded research study about decision-making in Black and Latino gay male emerging adults. Lourdes Dolores also received several awards and fellowships which allowed her and her colleagues to conduct two higher education studies: (1) “Equity and Excellence: Exploring Facilitators and Barriers to Student Success” and (2) “Experiences and Perceptions of Historically Underrepresented Faculty at Three CUNY Community Colleges”. At the time that she departed CUNY in Spring 2018, Lourdes Dolores was a tenured Associate Professor.

Lourdes Dolores’ current research and clinical interests are resilience in queer and trans* people of color; female sex workers’ resilience and resistance; using Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) to liberate people of color; and the experiences of historically underrepresented faculty. She has published several academic articles and book chapters, and her co-edited, award-winning book, Black LGBT Health in the United States: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation (Lexington) was published in 2016. Lourdes Dolores has a book chapter about sex therapy coming out in 2019 (Routledge) and she is working on a novel.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Lourdes Dolores Follins

Dr. Lourdes Dolores Follins

Like many in the United States, Dr. Lourdes Dolores Follins has had a number of careers over the past 25 years. However, her work has always been guided by a mantra she learned as a teen: Meliora (Latin: Always better). At this stage of her life, Lourdes Dolores is a psychotherapist... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 9:45am - 11:00am
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

11:00am

CUNY Humanities Alliance Graduate Student and Faculty Mentor Experience
Join the CUNY Humanities Alliance for a discussion about community college student-centered teaching and learning in the humanities and social sciences! In this roundtable discussion, LaGuardia Community College Faculty Mentors and Graduate Teaching Fellows from The Graduate Center will discuss their experiences in the CUNY Humanities Alliance program. Their discussion will highlight new insights that resulted from their work with their mentors and mentees, and how their experience in the CUNY Humanities Alliance program helped them develop professionally.

The discussion will address questions such as:
  • What new insights were gained as a result of your work with your mentee or mentor? What kinds of connections have been forged between community college faculty, doctoral students, and undergraduates in the first two years of this program?
  • What does it mean to teach the humanities at a community college? How do doctoral students translate their specialized research into their teaching of introductory and general education courses? In recalling your development as a lecturer/instructor, what do you think is the greatest benefit this experience provided you as a mentor or a mentee?
  • What are the lessons of this program so far for doctoral education and the future of the professoriate, at the Graduate Center and beyond?
 



Speakers
avatar for Cheri Carr

Cheri Carr

Associate Professor, LaGuardia
avatar for Inés Vañó García

Inés Vañó García

Mellon CUNY Humanities Alliance Graduate Teacher Fellow, The Graduate Center
DK

Demetrios Kapetanakos

Associate Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College
JK

Jonathan Kwan

Ph.D. Candidate, Humanities Alliance Teaching Fellow, CUNY Graduate Center
Preferred gender pronouns: He/him/hisBio: Jonathan is a philosophy Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, CUNY, a Humanities Alliance Teaching Fellow, and a fellow at the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. His research focuses on social and political philosophy, especially... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

12:00pm

Lunch
Buffet lunch will be provided.

Half of the tables will have conversation topics on them to support participants engaging in light conversation over lunch. Some of these tables will be marked "students only"; If you are not a student, please sit elsewhere.

The other half of the tables will be open and available to all. 

Thursday October 18, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

1:00pm

197: Difficult Texts
Limited Capacity filling up

For the presenters on this panel, when we teach, we want to be challenged. Our goal is to include students in a joint effort to struggle through the complicated questions that sit at the heart of our disciplines -- US history, literature, anthropology, analyses of race, gender, class, and inequality, etc. Because of these goals, it is important for us to assign work that we find interesting -- work that addresses our concerns and the concerns of our students. We strongly believe that difficult texts can be taught at many registers. Simple texts - ones that are easily accessible and make familiar and straightforward arguments - certainly have their place in the college classroom, but often they function within a narrower range of registers. We find them less useful in our classroom.

We want to be engaged and curious and excited about the material we encounter with our students. We find that our enthusiasm is contagious. We often talk to colleagues about teaching difficult texts and concepts to community college students. Some are surprised when they learn that we are asking our students to read material that even we find challenging. Many are convinced that that is an exercise doomed to failure.

These presenters will share their thoughts about why teaching difficult texts in community college humanities classrooms helps to build dynamic and inclusive learning environments. Each of us will demonstrate the strategies that we have developed to scaffold student engagement, and will invite discussion from participants about their strategies for achieving similar goals.

Speakers
AA

Anthony Alessandrini

Professor, Kingsborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: anyBio: Tony Alessandrini is a professor of English at Kingsborough Community College, and also teaches in the Middle Eastern Studies program at the Graduate Center.
LG

Libby Garland

Professor, Kingsborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: anyBio: Libby Garland is Associate Professor of History at Kingsborough Community College, where she teaches courses on U.S. immigration history, urban history, and the history of U.S. imperialism.
KM

Karen Miller

Professor, LaGuardia CC
Preferred Gender Pronouns: any Bio: I am a professor at LaGuardia Community College where I teach history. Together, I read texts with my students that I find challenging and from which I am learning and enormous amount.
AM

Andrea Morrell

Assistant Professor, Guttman Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: anyBio: Andrea Morrell is an anthropologist teaching classes in the first year program and in the Urban Studies program at Guttman Community College.


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 197, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

1:00pm

198: Centers for Teaching and Learning as Sites of Community-building and Experimentation
Limited Capacity filling up

Centers for Teaching and Learning play significant roles in the academic and administrative lives of campuses across CUNY and beyond. They support new and experienced faculty, advise departments on curriculum and evaluation, work closely with students and staff on a range of projects, and help envision, articulate, and enact administrative priorities for the campus. They are regularly the locus of experimentation and community around instructional practices, and the most effective and responsive Centers are built in dialogue with the varying constituencies that they serve. As such, these Centers often combine a common set of core services with unique characteristics that reflect how they are positioned on their specific campuses.

In this session, the directors of five CUNY CTLs — three community colleges, one senior college, and one graduate school — will discuss the structures and activities of their Centers, with specific attention to how their work supports instruction in the humanities and interpretive social sciences. They will then think together and with attendees about how specific trends at CUNY, such as Pathways, investments in educational technology and open educational resources, and evolving understandings about accessibility and inclusion necessarily impact the work they do.


Speakers
avatar for Carlos Guevara

Carlos Guevara

Director of the Office of Educational Technology and Co-Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, Hostos Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/him​Bio: With over 15 years of experience in Higher Education, Carlos Guevara currently works at Hostos Community College, CUNY, as Director of the Office of Educational Technology and Co-Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning. His research... Read More →
avatar for Eric Hofmann

Eric Hofmann

Assistant Dean for Teaching & Learning, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/HimBio: Eric oversees programming in LaGuardia’s Center for Teaching and Learning around innovative strategies that advance student learning, such as ePortfolio practice, culturally-responsive pedagogies, and developmental advising. A former composition... Read More →
avatar for Kathleen Landy

Kathleen Landy

Assistant Dean for Teaching & Learning, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Dr. Kathleen Landy is the Assistant Dean for Teaching & Learning at Queensborough Community College. Part of her role involves serving as the Director of the College’s Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning (CETL), which fosters pedagogical... Read More →
avatar for Allison Lehr Samuels

Allison Lehr Samuels

Director, Center for Teaching and Learning / Baruch College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herAllison Lehr Samuels is the Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Baruch College and is a full-time Lecturer with a focus on Entrepreneurship and Small Business at the Zicklin School of Business. She was the first recipient of the Zicklin... Read More →
avatar for Luke Waltzer

Luke Waltzer

Director, Teaching and Learning Center, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Luke Waltzer founded the Teaching and Learning Center at the Graduate Center, CUNY, in 2015. At the Graduate Center he also teaches in the Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Certificate Program and the Masters Program in Digital Humanities, is... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 198, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

1:00pm

204: Innovative Collaborative Pedagogy Across the Difference: Literature and Extremism
Limited Capacity seats available

This paper elaborates on a fall 2017 COIL experience between LaGuardia Community College and the University of TÄtouan, Morocco. This virtual online exchange allowed two very different college communities (a first-year liberal arts cluster and a second year Masters Program in English Literature) to come together to discuss difficult topics and cross cultural bridges. We hypothesized that literature could provide an alternative way of analyzing extremism. Therefore, the collaboration focused on the novel Horses of God written by the Moroccan author, Mahi Binabine. The novel traces the lives of four childhood friends growing up in the Sidi Moumen slum, near Casablanca, navigating poverty, violence and religious fundamentalism.

Our collaborative project draws on three pedagogical initiatives: learning communities, global learning and online mediated virtual exchanges. Learning communities involve an intentional restructuring of students╒ time, credit, and learning experiences in order to build community and foster explicit connections across disciplines. Clearly, an international conversation between American and Moroccan university students is a global learning experience that has the potential to build community and foster international dialogue.

As professors of language and literature, we were especially interested in the role of literature as a transformative agent.

Speakers
avatar for Habiba Boumlik

Habiba Boumlik

Associate Professor, LaGuardia CC
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Dr. Boumlik teaches Arabic and French at LaGuardia CC. Her publications include: “Female Activists in Tunisian Socio-Political Movements. The Case of Amira Yahyaoui” in Arab Women and the Media in Changing Landscapes. Springer. 2017. Doris... Read More →
avatar for Phyllis van Slyck

Phyllis van Slyck

Professor, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Phyllis van Slyck teaches writing and literature courses from a global perspective. She is interested in postcolonial literature, gender issues, and texts that elucidate the social and cultural construction of identity. Her forthcoming publications... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 204, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

1:00pm

205: Pathways and Composition: Writing Across the Disciplines
Limited Capacity seats available

In an effort to fulfill student completion and retention goals, the English Department at the Community College of Baltimore County is developing contextualized composition courses for the newly implemented, five academic pathways: Pre-Allied Health; Technology, Science, and Math; Business, Law, and Criminal Justice; Fine Arts (performance, visual, and media); and Behavioral Social Sciences and Humanities. The effort reinforces rhetorical strategies and objectives for expository writing╤organization, grammar, usage, mechanics╤while preserving, despite emphasis in new content, the pedagogical approaches common to humanities education. The intent is to approach what is traditionally defined as non-humanities subject matter from a humanities perspective. Students are challenged with specifically designed curriculum content delivered through class discussions, reading and writing assignments that is more germane to their declared career goals. This new, synthesized approach to composition secures the civic, personal, and professional landscapes of the future. This program is receiving funding from a Mellon grant awarded to CCBC: Humanities For All.

Speakers
BB

Brooke Bognanni

Professor of English, and English Department Chair, Community College of Baltimore County
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: I too am a member of the contextualization team. We saw a strong need at CCBC to contextualize English composition courses to coordinate with stuent pathways.
GC

Greg Campbell

Assistant Professor, English; and Deputy Director, Community College Humanities Association, Community College of Baltimore County
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: I am a member of a contextualization team that is rethinking composition courses. The objective behind “contextualized” courses in English composition is to offer writing curriculum alternatives for students committed to one of CCBC academic... Read More →
AC

Annmarie Chiarini

Associate Professor of English, CCBC, Essex Campus
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio:
AR

Andrew Rusnak

Associate Professor, English. Executive Director, Community College Humanities Association, Community College of Baltimore County
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: I am part of a team of professors who have contextualized English composition courses to coordinate with student pathways. The objective behind “contextualized” courses in English composition is to offer writing curriculum alternatives for... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 205, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, USA

1:00pm

201-202: Classrooms & Social Justice: Why Start with Pedagogy?
Limited Capacity filling up

This panel looks at the relationship between classroom participation and democracy, focusing on active, engaged learning methods that you can use in your classroom today. Panelists will offer student-centered activities that have been successful in their own classrooms, and participants will have the opportunity to try out some activities themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Davidson

Cathy Davidson

The Graduate Center
CK

Christina Katopodis

Futures Initiative Fellow and doctoral candidate in English, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Christina Katopodis is a Futures Initiative Fellow, a doctoral candidate in English, and a New Media Lab fellow at the CUNY Graduate Center, and an adjunct at Hunter College. She is writing her dissertation on the influences of sound and sonic vibration on American Transcendentalism... Read More →
avatar for Siqi Tu

Siqi Tu

Futures Initiative Graduate Fellow and Doctoral Candidate in Sociology, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Siqi Tu is a Futures Initiative Fellow and a doctoral candidate in Sociology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. She earned a BA degree in Sociology from Fudan University (China) and a MA degree in Sociology from Columbia University. Her work focuses on the areas of urban sociology, immigration... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 201-202, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

1:00pm

203: Signposting Professional Pathways: Identifying Core Values and Pursuing Integrative Professional Development
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on integrative graduate student professional development, drawing from lessons learned through Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics, a Mellon-funded initiative at the University of Washington that centrally addresses the need to prepare the next generation of educators with the pedagogical and professional knowledge they will need to pursue a community college career. The session will frame an interactive activity with a discussion of the Reaching New Publics program, a core component of the Mellon initiative that pairs doctoral student fellows with community college faculty mentors over an academic year, during which fellows pursue activities that range from class observations to faculty meetings. Through these activities, our fellows have been prompted to recognize their core values -- educational access, inclusive classrooms, and so forth -- and further have noted that specific institutional contexts better "fit" these values. In other words, the Mellon fellows have consistently reported greater professional clarity and motivation as significant gains, prompting us to realize that career preparation centrally entails the work of discernment, and that a thoughtful identification and integration of interests, talents, and commitments is essential to the success of professional development for a wider range of careers beyond the research university.

Speakers
avatar for Annie Dwyer

Annie Dwyer

Assistant Program Director, Simpson Center for the Humanities
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/Her Bio: Annie Dwyer is the Assistant Program Director for Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics at the University of Washington's Simpson Center for the Humanities. As Assistant Program Director, Annie leads the strategic development... Read More →
avatar for Zhenzhen He-Weatherford

Zhenzhen He-Weatherford

PhD Candidate, University of Washington
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Zhenzhen He-Weatherford is a PhD candidate in Language and Rhetoric as well as a pre-doctoral instructor in the Department of English at University of Washington. Her scholarly interests include critical multiculturalism, critical pedagogies... Read More →
AT

Asha Tran

Faculty, South Seattle College
Asha Tran teaches Spanish at South Seattle College. She has served as a mentor for the Mellon-funded initiative at the University of Washington entitled 'Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics. The experience has been profoundly rewarding, inspiring and productiv... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
GC, Room 203, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

2:00pm

Break
Thursday October 18, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

2:30pm

198: Multilingualism in Higher Education
Limited Capacity filling up

In this presentation, we first illustrate unprecedented linguistic diversity in the U.S., using data from the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey between 1980 and 2010. Community Colleges (CCs) are in the forefront of this new wave of linguistic and cultural diversity as CCs are often an entry point to higher education for immigrants and children of immigrants. Two linguistically and culturally distinctive stories are shared with the audience; one focuses on linguistic stigmatization among 1st and 1.5-generation Korean-American students and the other focuses on classroom experience of Latino/a students at community colleges. Pedagogical implications and recommendations for higher educational institutions will be discussed among the audience.

Speakers
AF

Alexander Funk

Teacher, Patterson High School
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Alexander Funk is an instructor with Baltimore City Public Schools. Together with Tomonori Nagano and Eric Ketcham, he helped design, administer and analyze results of the Students and Instructors of Languages at Community Colleges (SILCC) Surveys... Read More →
avatar for Luis Henao

Luis Henao

The Teaching and Learning Center
Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
EK

Eric Ketcham

Assistant Director of the Center for Integrated Language Communities, The CUNY Graduate Center
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Eric Ketcham is the assistant director of the Center for Integrated Language Communities (CILC). Working with Tomonori Nagano and Alexander Funk, he helped to design, administer, and analyze results of the Students and Instructors of Languages... Read More →
SK

Sujung Kim

Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Graduate Center/ CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
avatar for Tomonori Nagano

Tomonori Nagano

Associate Professor & Coordinator of the Modern Languages and Literatures Program, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
Tomonori Nagano is an Associate Professor of Japanese and Linguistics at LaGuardia Community College (CUNY). He also coordinates the Modern Languages and Literatures Program, overseeing the administration and teaching of 15 different languages and national literatures. Dr. Nagano... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 198, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

2:30pm

205: Student Unconference
Limited Capacity seats available

This is a student-only session for those who want to discuss topics not curated as conference panels. Please post your topic ideas on the poster board during the conference day or lunchtime. Even if you agree with a topic already there. Put another post-it on to agree!

We'll group the topics, and discuss the most popular ones in small groups. 

Speakers
avatar for Inés Vañó García

Inés Vañó García

Mellon CUNY Humanities Alliance Graduate Teacher Fellow, The Graduate Center


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 205, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, USA

2:30pm

201-202: Humanistic Pedagogy Across the Disciplines: Approaches to Mass Atrocity Education in the Community College Context
Limited Capacity seats available

Long referred to as "Democracy's Colleges," community colleges educate almost 50 percent of American undergraduates. At a socio-historical moment rife with tensions that threaten understanding, they bring students of diverse backgrounds and experiences together in the study of significant humanities questions. The proposed panel collates insights from six years of intensive Holocaust, genocide, and human rights education at Queensborough Community College, CUNY to offer four approaches - Arts-Based, Social Justice, Textual, and Outcomes-Based - to designing innovative, integrative, and differentiated pedagogies for today╒s imperatives and college students. Panelists include most of the contributors to Humanistic Pedagogy Across the Disciplines: Approaches to Mass Atrocity Education in the Community College Context, a volume edited by Amy E. Traver and Dan Leshem and slated for publication by Palgrave Macmillan in winter 2018.

Speakers
AA

Azadeh Aalai

Assistant Professor, Queensborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Azadeh Aalai, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of psychology at Queensborough Community College (QCC), CUNY. She is a social psychologist specializing in mass media depictions, the psychology of aggression, warfare and genocide, and gender-related... Read More →
KA

Kathleen Alves

Assistant Professor, City University of New York-Queensborough
Preferred gender pronouns:Kathleen Tamayo Alves, D.A. is an assistant professor of English at Queensborough Community College, CUNY, where she teaches literature and composition. She holds an M.A. and a D.A. in English from St. John’s University. Her research centers on eighteenth-century... Read More →
AA

Aliza Atik

Assistant Professor in English, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Aliza Atik, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in English at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She received her Ph.D. from Stony Brook University in 2013 where she won several awards for her scholarship, including an Andrew W. Mellon dissertation... Read More →
JC

Julia Carroll

Professor, QCC, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Julia B. Carroll, Ph.D., is a professor of English, developmental English, and ESL at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She has co-authored multiple peer-reviewed articles focused on teaching reading and writing skills to multilingual learners... Read More →
SD

Steven Dahlke

Associate Professor of Music, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Steven Dahlke, D.M.A., is an associate professor of music at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in vocal performance, choral music, and music education from the University of Southern California... Read More →
BE

Barbara Emanuele

Adjunct Lecturer, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Barbara K. Emanuele, M.A., is an adjunct lecturer of English at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She has served as an educator and an administrator in CUNY for over twenty years. Her focus is on composition instruction to students in an... Read More →
FF

Franca Ferrari-Bridgers

Associate Professor, QCC
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Franca Ferrari-Bridgers, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of communication at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She was born in Milan, Italy. She holds a Master’s degree in Hispano-American languages and literatures (1995) from the Universit... Read More →
AG

Aviva Geismar

Assistant Professor, Queensborough Community College
Preferred gender pronoun:Aviva Geismar, M.F.A. is an assistant professor in health, physical education and dance at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. Geismar is also the artistic director of Drastic Action, a contemporary dance company that has performed extensively in New York... Read More →
SJ

Susan Jacobowitz

Associate Professor in the English Department, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Susan Jacobowitz, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the English Department at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. She earned her doctorate at Brandeis University. Her research areas include second-generation literature including graphic... Read More →
CL

Cary Lane

Assistant Professor, Queensborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Cary Lane, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of English at Queensborough Community College, CUNY, where he teaches freshman composition, developmental reading, and developmental writing. He also serves as curator-in-residence at the Kupferberg... Read More →
ML

Mirna Lekić

Assistant Professor of Music, Queensborough Community College
Mirna Lekić, D.M.A., is an assistant professor of music at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. A pianist, she is active as a recitalist, chamber musician, and educator. She has performed in the United States, Canada, and Europe at venues including Carnegie-Weill Hall, Symphony... Read More →
BM

Benjamin Miller

Assistant Professor, English, Queensborough Community College (CUNY)
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Benjamin Lawrance Miller, M.F.A. is an assistant professor in English at Queensborough Community College, CUNY, where he teaches composition and creative writing. He has a M.F.A. in writing from CalArts and a B.A. in philosophy from Boston University... Read More →
AT

Amy Traver

Associate Professor, Sociology, QCC, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Amy E. Traver, Ph.D., is an associate professor of sociology at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. Her research interests include student success in community colleges, and adoption, race/ethnicity, and gender in American family life. Her... Read More →
RM

Rose Marie Äikäs

Associate Professor, CUNY - Queensborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Rose-Marie Äikäs, Ph.D., M.A., M.S.W., is an associate professor of criminal justice at Queensborough Community College, CUNY. Dr. Äikäs has international and domestic prison research experience, professional experience as a criminal justice... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 201-202, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

2:30pm

203: Expanding Definitions of Humanities Scholarship
Limited Capacity filling up

Humanities PhDs are encouraged early in their careers to specialize, and to present their research in a relatively narrow range of genres: the peer-reviewed article, book chapter, or academic monograph. Yet a number of factors—from the availability of digital tools and platforms, to the growth of alt-ac careers and the rise of open-access publishing—are challenging these norms of scholarly production and communication.
                                                                                                  
This session will feature a discussion with humanities scholars from several CUNY campuses—two community colleges, a senior college, and a graduate school—whose research has either grown to encompass new sub-fields (such as the scholarship of teaching and learning), or expanded into new forms (including audio-visual essays, public-facing writing, and digital projects).  Panelists will share their experiences engaging in new scholarly modes, as well as the professional opportunities and challenges they’ve encountered in doing so. 

Their remarks will be followed by a Q&A with the audience, which we hope will raise questions such as: How should humanities scholarship be (re)defined in the 21st century? What forms of scholarship do (and should) “count” for tenure and promotion, and how do those standards vary across institutions? How can scholars navigate those institutional standards, while working to change them? How might the requirements for dissertations in the humanities be revised to reflect the evolving state of the academy? What are the particular affordances of public-facing humanities scholarship at this moment in U.S. history?
 
Following this interactive discussion, participants will engage in an exercise designed to generate thinking about a new audience, direction, and/or format for their scholarship. Participants can expect to leave the session with actionable ideas for presenting their research in a new genre or venue.


Speakers
EA

Elizabeth Alsop

Assistant Professor, CUNY School of Professional Studies
Preferred gender pronouns: She, her, hersElizabeth Alsop is Assistant Professor and Academic Director of Communication and Media at the CUNY School of Professional Studies, where she also directs the new B.A. program in Liberal Studies. Previously, she served as the Mellon Humanities... Read More →
avatar for Leah Anderst

Leah Anderst

Assistant Professor of English, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
Preferred gender pronouns: She, her, hersLeah Anderst is an Assistant Professor at QCC where she teaches all levels of writing, as well as literature and film studies classes. She co-coordinates QCC’s Accelerated Learning Program which is a basic writing mainstreaming model, and... Read More →
RB

Ria Banerjee

Assistant Professor of English, Guttman Community College
Preferred gender pronouns: She, her, hersRia Banerjee is an Assistant Professor of English at CUNY's Guttman Community College. Before this, she worked across the CUNY system as a graduate student teaching fellow and adjunct. Her scholarly interests are in British and European modernism... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Ferguson

Kevin Ferguson

Associate Professor of English, Queens College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He, him, hisKevin L. Ferguson is associate professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York, where he directs Writing at Queens and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on digital humanities, film adaptation, college writing, and... Read More →
LR

Lisa Rhody

Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives, The Graduate Center
Preferred gender pronouns: She, her, hersLisa Rhody is Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives at The Graduate Center, CUNY. She is an administrator, teacher, and researcher whose work has considered the varied and often complicated ways in which emerging digital technologies change... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 203, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

2:30pm

204: Code switching in Psychology
Limited Capacity seats available

We will discuss different "psychologies" and codes as we navigate the field of Psychology in different context. There are variations in how we present ourselves and the material in different contexts within the field of Psychology our subfield of Environmental Psychology, or in a interdisciplinary context, at the Graduate Center or at community colleges, amongst peers or different student populations in advanced courses or in introductory courses. An exploration of this code-switching may allow us to become more effective teachers and scholars.

Speakers
JA

Jennifer Adler

Adjunct Lecturer, Consultant, Graduate Student, BMCC
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Jennifer Adler is an Adjunct Lecturer at BMCC. She is on the Board of Directors of the Adaptive Design Association, and a graduate student in Environmental Psychology Sub-Program at the Graduate Center.
RD

Rebio Diaz Cardona

Asst. Prof. of Psychology, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Rebio Diaz Cardona is an Asst. Prof of Psychology at LaGuardia Community College. He has also taught at CUNY the Graduate Center.
TI

Tomo Imamichi

Asst. Professor, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Tomo Imamichi is an Asst. Prof of Psychology at LaGuardia Community College. He and David Chapin have an accepted Future Initiative course titled "The Environmental Psychology of Care" to be taught in the Fall 2018 semester at the Graduate Ce... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 204, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

2:30pm

197: Teaching Literature at LaGuardia Community College: Theory and Praxis
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel will explore the theory and praxis of engaging humanities scholarship and pedagogy at community colleges. This involves mobilizing the range of ways students and faculty use writing and literature to address questions of identity, academic discourse, class, nationality, migration, and transnationalism. Panelists will examine both why and how we engage community college students in literary study through close reading and transdisciplinary practices that challenge hegemonic epistemic structures while legitimizing narratives of diverse nations, cultures, and bodies. Members of the LaGuardia English Department will engage in dialogue with a LaGuardia alumnus currently pursuing an MA in English. This conversation will survey theories and scholarship, including Freire╒s problem-posing model of education and the African American, Reconstruction-era scholar-activist Anna Julia Cooper whose work with Freylinghuysen University prefigured the establishment of the American community college movement.

We will demonstrate how teaching, for instance, George Orwell╒s 1984, poems of Ntozake Shange, or Lynn Nottage╒s Sweat, offers opportunities for students to critically reflect on the canon while at the same time explore diverse literary representations of identities╤locally, nationally, and globally. The panel will conclude by highlighting the structural challenges to implementing a humanistic pedagogy and shed light on possible constructive responses.

Speakers
AA

Allia Abdullah-Matta

Associate Professor, CUNY LaGuardia
NB

Nilo Bermeo

Adjunct Lecturer, LAGCC
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Nilo Bermeo is an Adjunct Lecturer of English at LaGuardia Community College, where he teaches course in developmental writing, composition, and technical writing. He also works as a tutor in LaGuardia’s Writing Center. He received his AA in... Read More →
CB

Cristina Bruns

Associate Professor, LaGuardia Community College CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Cristina Vischer Bruns, Associate Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College, has over twenty years’ experience teaching college composition and literature courses. Her scholarship focuses on the experience of reading fiction and... Read More →
TC

Tuli Chatterji

Assistant Professor, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Tuli Chatterji is Assistant Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College. Her current research focuses on postcolonial intervention in composition studies where she contextualizes immigrant students’ multi-local experiences. Her publications... Read More →
SC

Sorin Cucu

Associate Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College
Bio: Sorin Radu Cucu is Associate Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College. He is the author of The Underside of Politics: Global Fictions in the Fog of the Cold War published by Fordham UP. His most recent article re-examines the Cold War reception of Herman Melville’s... Read More →
JJ

Jacqueline Jones

Associate Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Dr. Jacqueline Jones is an Associate Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College, and currently serving as a faculty mentor in the CUNY Humanities Alliance program. Her research interest includes 20th and 21st century African American... Read More →
LP

LaRose Parris

Associate Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: LaRose T. Parris is Associate Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College. Her transdisciplinary study, Being Apart: Theoretical and Existential Resistance in Africana Literature, was awarded the Nicolás Guillén prize for outstanding... Read More →
GT

Gordon Tapper

English Department Chair, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Gordon Tapper is Chair of the English Department, LaGuardia Community College, and Chair of the CUNY English Discipline Council. His research interests include American Studies, Modernism, contemporary poetry, and Genocide Studies. Among other... Read More →


Thursday October 18, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
GC, Room 197, Concourse Level 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, USA

3:30pm

Break
Thursday October 18, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

4:00pm

Featuring Community College Student Work
LaGuardia Community College students who were in classes with CUNY Humanities Alliance Graduate Teaching Fellows will talk about their work in those classes, and answer questions about their work in Humanities Alliance classes, their student experience, and their own aspirations. 

Speakers
avatar for Luis Henao

Luis Henao

The Teaching and Learning Center
Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
JK

Jonathan Kwan

Ph.D. Candidate, Humanities Alliance Teaching Fellow, CUNY Graduate Center
Preferred gender pronouns: He/him/hisBio: Jonathan is a philosophy Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, CUNY, a Humanities Alliance Teaching Fellow, and a fellow at the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. His research focuses on social and political philosophy, especially... Read More →
avatar for Kahdeidra Martin

Kahdeidra Martin

Mellon Humanities Alliance Graduate Teaching Fello, The Graduate Center, CUNY
HO

Hansol Oh

PhD student, Gaduate Center CUNY
MR

Micheal Rumore

CUNY Graduate Center
JS

Jacob Sachs-Mishalanie

PhD Candidate in Composition & Mellon Humanities Alliance Teaching Fellow, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Preferred Pronouns: He/HimShort Bio: Originally from Utica, NY, Jacob Sachs-Mishalanie is a Brooklyn based composer, songwriter, and teacher. In his recent music and research, his central focus is on the expressive and sonic relationships between acoustic instruments and electronic... Read More →
RS

Richard Simo

richard312395@gmail.com
MT

Mohammad Toufiq

maroof.raktim@gmail.com
JV

Josselyn Velasquez

ocaris.jos@gmail.com


Thursday October 18, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

5:00pm

What We Learned: Participatory Reflection
We're all attending different sessions during the day. This is an opportunity for us to come together and share our biggest insights from the day with moderators. 

Speakers

Thursday October 18, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA

6:30pm

Reception at the Amie and Tony James Gallery
Thursday October 18, 2018 6:30pm - 8:30pm
The Graduate Center, Concourse Level 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA
 
Friday, October 19
 

TBA

Friday at LaGuardia Community College, E building, 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY
All events on Friday will be hosted at LaGuardia Community College, in the E building, located at 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY. 

Friday October 19, 2018 TBA

7:00am

Meet for Transit at NYMA Hotel Lobby
If you would like to have a student guide lead you through the metro system from Manhattan to LaGuardia Community College in Long Island City, please meet at the lobby of the NYMA hotel between 7:00 am and 8:30 am. Please come early! Transit takes about 45-60 minutes. Those who leave close to 8:30 am may not have time to get breakfast before the welcome session begins at LaGuardia.

 Roundtrip metrocards will be provided for each person who joins the guides. 

Please note that transit involves walking about 10 city blocks, and going up and down several flights of stairs. If you do not feel comfortable doing these activities, a car will be leaving NYMA hotel at 8:00 am to go to LaGuardia Community College. Early in the morning, traffic often takes longer than transit does. 

Speakers
SK

Sujung Kim

Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Graduate Center/ CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:


Friday October 19, 2018 7:00am - 8:30am
nyma, The New York Manhattan Hotel 6 W 32nd St, New York, NY 10001, USA

8:30am

Breakfast & Registration
Friday October 19, 2018 8:30am - 9:30am
LaGuardia Community College, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

9:30am

Welcome
Speakers
DB

Dr. Bret Eynon

Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
avatar for Eric Hofmann

Eric Hofmann

Assistant Dean for Teaching & Learning, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/HimBio: Eric oversees programming in LaGuardia’s Center for Teaching and Learning around innovative strategies that advance student learning, such as ePortfolio practice, culturally-responsive pedagogies, and developmental advising. A former composition... Read More →
GM

Gail Mellow

President, LaGuardia Community College


Friday October 19, 2018 9:30am - 10:00am
LaGuardia Main Stage, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

M-108: Technology, Equity, and Pedagogy: Fostering Connection in the Classroom and Beyond
Limited Capacity seats available

How can community college faculty, staff, and students make the best use of technology? When selected and used thoughtfully, digital tools can help foster connection and engagement among community college students—whether in the classroom or beyond it. Students are more connected than ever, with smartphones in nearly every pocket, and there are many tools to help instructors to create engaging, pedagogically sound lessons and instruction. Digital platforms can also foster a sense of community and connection among students who may have limited time with their peers outside of class. At the same time, reliable internet/computer access can be limited, and may not be sufficient for fully engaging in course websites or assignments. Moreover, an overreliance on digital tools may become alienating.

This session uses brief presentations, conversation-style discussion, and audience participation to discuss the ways that technology can be used in support of the access-oriented missions of community colleges. Topics will range from big-picture considerations to specific technological tools that can build community, enhance classroom discussions, and facilitate culturally responsive pedagogy.

Speakers
KH

Kashema Hutchinson

Ph.D. student in the Urban Education, Ms.
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/HerBio: Kashema Hutchinson is a Ph.D. student in the Urban Education program at the Graduate Center (CUNY). She has a B.A. in Communications: Advertising/Public Relations and an M.A. in Sociology. She is currently a Communications and Leadership Fellow... Read More →
MR

Mariana Regalado

Head of Reference and Instruction, Brooklyn College Library
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Mariana Regalado is the head of Reference and Instruction at the Brooklyn College Library, where she assists students to become smart, curious, and confident information seekers. Her interest in how students experience the research process, travel... Read More →
avatar for Katina Rogers

Katina Rogers

Futures Initiative, The Graduate Center, CUNY, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/HerBio: As the Futures Initiative’s Director of Administration and Programs, Katina Rogers guides and mentors graduate fellows, develops programming, and exercises administrative oversight over all aspects of the program. Her scholarly work focuses... Read More →
MS

Maura Smale

Chief Librarian, NYC College of Technology
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/HerBio: Maura Smale is Chief Librarian and Professor at the Ursula C. Schwerin Library, New York City College of Technology (City Tech), and faculty in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Smale was... Read More →
KS

Kerri-Ann Smith

Assistant Professor, Queensborough Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/HerBio: Kerri-Ann M. Smith began her teaching career as a part of the fifth cohort of New York City Teaching Fellows (2002). She received her B.A. in English Literature and Africana Studies, along with a certificate in Latin America and Caribbean Area... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room M-108, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

E-150: Adult Learners in Community College
Limited Capacity seats available

Using narrative inquiry, I draw from the experience of my mother as an adult learner at a community college and expunged “funds of knowledge” (Moll, et al., 1992). I argue that structural and pedagogical moves such as providing supplementary technical support for digital skill-building, offering support groups, inviting students’ experiential knowledge into classrooms, providing unique work opportunities and transitional services to the workforce, and counting work experience as college credit can enhance adult learners’ experiences in community college settings.

Speakers
AS

Ah-Young Song

Graduate Student, Teachers College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Ah-Young Song is a doctoral student in English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room E-150, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

E-258: The Power of Early Academic Engagement With Core Texts in Community College
Limited Capacity seats available

Some see the study of Great Books as a privilege reserved for the elite. Austin Community College╒s first-year student success seminar The Great Questions Seminar and Hostos Community College╒s Columbia Common Core at Hostos seek to change that perception. Community college students not only deserve the same academic challenges offered at prestigious colleges and universities, they thrive when presented with them. Early academic engagement with challenging core texts helps frame college as a place where students go not only to acquire a credential essential for gainful employment but also to explore questions that are important to them as human beings. Through the discussion based study of authors like Homer, Plato, Machiavelli and DuBois, students learn the practice and skills necessary to speak clearly, read carefully, reason effectively, and think creatively, all of which create a solid foundation upon which they can build any academic major and profession they choose to pursue, as well as a life of engaged civic participation. In this session conference participants will engage with community college faculty/administrators and students as they actively explore the power of early academic engagement with core texts in the setting of the community college.

Speakers
AF

Andrea Fabrizio

Associate Professor of English, Eugenio Maria de Hostos Community College/CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Andrea Fabrizio is the Deputy Chair of the Hostos English Department, Co-coordinator of the Hostos Writing-across-the-Curriculum Initiative, and Co-PI of the Columbia Core at Hostos Initiative, a grant funded project that aims to incorporate... Read More →
avatar for Theodore Hadzi-Antich Jr.

Theodore Hadzi-Antich Jr.

Department Chair/Associate Professor, Government, Austin Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Ted is Department Chair and Associate Professor of Government at Austin Community College, where he has taught for over 10 years. Ted founded The Great Questions Project in 2014, which has reimagined the first year student success course as an... Read More →
GM

Gregory Marks

Associate Professor, Hostos Community College - CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Gregory Marks is Chair of the Hostos Department of English and co-PI of Columbia Core at Hostos, a program aimed at bringing the classic texts of Columbia University's Core program to students of the south Bronx. He lives in Queens with his wife... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room E-258, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

E-266: Supporting Students and the Humanities through a Guided Pathway Framework
Limited Capacity seats available

General education coursework, of which the humanities is a part, is not "just another course to get out of the way" within a student's educational pathway. In this session, participants will learn how the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD), through the implementation of Guided Pathways (GP), is moving faculty from this mental model to one that views general education in general, and the humanities in particular, as being part of an essential, intentional and coherent learning experience. The GP framework represents a collective, institution-wide transformation of practices, policies, structures, and mental models. Pathway mapping, a key element of the GP redesign, is the process of mapping out academic certificates, degrees, trade and technical training programs, and transfer options. Effective implementation of pathway mapping involves engaging faculty from all disciplines, both occupational and transfer, in an intentional mapping process grounded in backward design principles, with a focus on developing holistic program learning outcomes. This approach affirms the importance of humanities education in the lives and careers of students and transforms faculty reluctance into enthusiasm to engage and support the process, resulting in positive outcomes for student learning.

Speakers
SB

Steve Budge

Professor, Mesa Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Steve Budge served as the co-chair of the Guided Pathways Task Force at Mesa Community College for two years. He currently serves as the the change management leader supporting the implementation of Guided Pathways across the Maricopa Community... Read More →
JF

Jennifer Fay

Residential Faculty, Mesa Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: For the last three years Jennifer Fay has coordinated the pathway mapping work at Mesa Community College (MCC). She currently serves as the co-chair of the Guided Pathways task force at MCC and a team lead of the pathway mapping work within the... Read More →
avatar for Matt Jolly

Matt Jolly

Professor, Gateway Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Matthew Jolly teaches English, creative writing, and literature at GateWay Community College. For the past year, he has been one of the guided pathways leads for his college and has been a co-chair for Maricopa’s district-wide Meta Majors Work... Read More →
CN

Camille Newton

Professor, South Mountain Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Camille Newton started work on Guided Pathways three years ago as a co-coordinator of South Mountain Community College’s Quality Initiative Project, an HLC accreditation effort. For the past year, she has worked as a team lead on the Maricopa... Read More →
RO

Robin Ozz

Director of Developmental Education & Innovation, Phoenix College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Robin Ozz started work on Guided Pathways 11 years ago as a Director of Developmental Education and Innovation at Phoenix College. For the past year, she has worked as a team lead on the Maricopa District’s Guided Pathways Pathway Mapping group... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room E-266, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

M-107: Articulating Success: Facilitating Student Continuity and Transfer from Two-Year to Four-Year Colleges
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, faculty and student representatives from LaGuardia Community College, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Queens College will discuss the facilitation and implementation of advising strategies and transfer opportunities for Writing and Literature students as they apply to four-year colleges at CUNY. Current and former LaGuardia students who have applied and/or transferred to a four-year CUNY college will discuss their experiences with the process, sharing challenges and suggestions for better communication and a smoother transition from one campus to the next. English department faculty from the three institutions will share the rationale behind creating articulation agreements between two- and four-year colleges as well as the systems in place to inform and advise students of these opportunities. The role of advisement, articulation agreements, departmental and cross-campus events, data collection and analysis, programmatic assessment, and the use of technology will also be highlighted.

Speakers
MP

Margaret (Peggy) Escher

Lecturer, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Margaret (Peggy) Escher received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from New York University. She chaired the John Jay College committee that collaborated with LaGuardia Community College to establish an articulation agreement between the two... Read More →
FM

Francisco Mejia

Student, LaGuardia Community College
MP

Michelle Pacht

Professor, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Michelle Pacht is a Professor of English at LaGuardia Community College. She served as the Writing and Literature Major Program Director for eight years and helped create the articulation agreement with John Jay College. She teaches a range of... Read More →
JS

Jesse Schwartz

Assistant Professor, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Jesse W. Schwarz is an assistant professor of English at LaGuardia Community College, where he is Chair of the Writing and Literature Major Committee and Co-Coordinator of the Advising Team for English Majors. His research focuses on radical politics... Read More →
avatar for Ashli Smith

Ashli Smith

student, Queens College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: I am an English major at Queens College. I am hoping to enter the field of media/television one day. I am currently a new YouTuber and I practice photography as a hobby.
KW

Karen Weingarten

Associate Professor, Queens College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Karen is an associate professor of English at Queens College. As Associate Chair of the English Department she does a lot of advising, and she works with students and other faculty members on transfer questions and issues for the major.


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room M-107, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

10:15am

E-129: Student-Centered Extracurricular Models to Build Community & Explore Humanities
Limited Capacity seats available

The LaGuardia Mellon Humanities Scholars program is an extracurricular program of the CUNY Humanities Alliance. Its goal is to enrich LaGuardia students’ understanding of the Humanities, and help them build academic and career pathways in the Humanities. Humanities Scholars design and create individual projects that connect their personal interests, scholarly pursuits, and career goals. Through biweekly meetings and additional humanities enrichment activities, the Humanities Scholars are exposed to modes of critical and creative thinking, various historical and cultural perspectives, and aesthetic appreciation. With the student at the center, this group determines what they need to succeed to towards graduation and their future careers.

Previous Humanities Scholars will share their experiences in the program and a bit about their individual project work, and the co-facilitators will share some of their methods. Mostly, we are excited to engage in a conversation with participants about how extracurricular programs can help build communities, engage students, and open up new worlds for community college students. We want to hear about experiences that you've had at your schools, and compare notes! 


Speakers
avatar for Kaysi Holman

Kaysi Holman

Director of Programs and Administration, CUNY Humanities Alliance
GM

Giselle Mendoza

Mellon Humanities Scholar, CUNY Laguardia Community college
avatar for Stefanie Sertich

Stefanie Sertich

Professor, LaGuardia Community College
IT

Ivan Taurisano

ivantaurisano93@gmail.com


Friday October 19, 2018 10:15am - 11:15am
LaGuardia, Room E-129, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:15am

Break
Friday October 19, 2018 11:15am - 11:30am
LaGuardia Community College, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

E-150: From Diversity to Inclusion: Students Share Experiences and Best Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is draws upon student experiences with diversity and inclusion at LaGuardia. While LaGuardia boasts a student body with representation from all over the globe, it also faces the unique challenge of ensuring that each culture and ethnicity is respected and recognized at all facets of the institution, from student services to the classroom. Students will reflect upon what makes for a fruitful, meaningful, inclusive environment. Students will also share struggles and shortcomings in this regard, offering staff and faculty advice for handling the variety of issues inherent to such a racially and ethnically diverse institution.

Followed by a Q&A, the roundtable will emphasize the following:
  • Reflections of challenges with diversity and inclusion in the classroom;
  • Strategies (be they effective or ineffective) exercised by instructors in creating welcoming environments, de-escalating tension, discussing race, and creating inclusion;
  • Suggestions for administrators and staff in achieving their goal of inclusive, culturally sensitive programming and delivering service
FSOC hopes to use this as a platform for an ongoing conversation that will result in focused events around inclusion, ultimately continuing the Opening Sessions theme over the course of the academic year.

Speakers

Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room E-150, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

E-129: Co-Authoring Learning and Development: Transformative Learning in a Community College
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will discuss an alternative retention model for community colleges implemented in the Peer Activist Learning Community (PALC), a faculty-led, peer-supported project at LaGCC. Inspired by Stetsenko’s Transformative Activist Stance (2016), PALC seeks to transform transmission-type, utilitarian educational practices, while spuring agentive learning through critical-theoretical pedagogy (Vianna & Stetsenko, 2011) wherein critical concepts in the social sciences/humanities are learned as analytical tools for (a) promoting critical engagement with knowledge, disclosing its competing and often contradictory ethical-political underpinnings while simultaneously (b) facilitating a stance on community and institutional practices in the college and the wider world, to contest the status quo. Framed within critical theoretical readings, discussions connect, contextualize, and transform students' conceptualization of educational practices as they share their struggles with courses and with connecting college learning with their aspirations and participation in community practices. This process bridges students’ learning goals and overall life pursuits and positions them as active contributors to a curriculum that addresses their thematic universe (Freire, 1970). As they negotiate diverse discourses and positions toward social issues and practices, students gain confidence to challenge and transform the power dynamics in pedagogical research and to contest the imposition of academic knowledge that perpetuates passivity and oppression.

Speakers
SA

Sukhrob Abdushukurov

Community College Student, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Sukhrob Abdushukurov is a student majoring in psychology at LaGuardia Community College. He was the winner of the 37th Annual Library Research Review Competition at LaGCC in 2017. Sukhrob, as an active PALC member since Spring 2017, has presented... Read More →
LD

Lucia Dikaczova

City College Student/LaGCC Graduate, City College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Lucia Dikaczova is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy at City College. She participated in the CUNY Undergraduate Research program where she worked on a project in astronomy and astrophysics in collaboration with Natural History... Read More →
TL

Thiago Lucena

Hunter College Student/LaGCC Graduate, Hunter College, CUNY
Bio: Thiago Lucena is a Leadership Fellow for the Futures Initiative Leadership program studying Psychology at Hunter College. Thiago, as an active PALC member since Fall 2016, has presented on a PALC symposium for the Futures Initiative series, University Worth Fighting For event... Read More →
FM

Francisco Medina

Graduate Student, Graduate Center, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/him Bio: Francisco A. Medina is a doctoral student in the Urban Education program at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He is currently a MAGNET mentor for the Pipeline program and a research assistant in the Peer Activist Learning Community (PALC). In general... Read More →
AP

Araminta Poole

Community College Student, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Araminta Poole is a Psychology student at LaGuardia Community College, CUNY. Araminta, as an active PALC member since Spring 2015, has presented on a PALC symposium for the Futures Initiative series, University Worth Fighting For event, titled... Read More →
MR

Michael Rifino

Graduate Student/LaGCC Adjunct Lecturer, CUNY Graduate Center
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Mike Rifino is a doctoral student in Developmental Psychology at the Graduate Center, CUNY. As a LaGCC student, Mike Rifino began his experience with student-led research and community building when he was invited to the Peer Activist Learning... Read More →
EV

Eduardo Vianna

Professor, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Eduardo Vianna is Professor of Psychology at LaGuardia Community College. He received his Ph.D. in developmental psychology at the CUNY-Graduate Center. Drawing from the Transformative Activist Stance approach, he has carried out research in various... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room E-129, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

E-258: A practical approach to grounding first-year experience coursework in academic content
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation discusses the construction of First-Year Experience courses: "Ethnography of Work" and "The Citizen and Society". These courses tie to the larger goal of establishing a strong foundation in the humanities through the NH Humanities Collaborative by establishing career exploration and college preparedness within an academic discipline. The curricula are grounded in the value of humanities by employing non-traditional pedagogical strategies to meet the needs of variety of audiences and transferring to four-year colleges as content-specific coursework. Student-led projects encourage the investigation of the world through the frameworks of workplace culture and the public sphere. "Ethnography" integrates the concepts typically covered in a first-year experience course within anthropological theory and methods to explore the culture of work.

"Citizen" continues the process, helping students look to public policy as training for active citizenship, using collaborative skills to achieve objectives. This two-part course combines a more traditional political science groundwork with activities in which students in groups research, plan, and propose a project of their choosing to tackle a community problem and benefit the commonwealth. The combination of these courses can provide first year community college students with real world experience, personal development, civic engagement, and student involvement in the humanities.

Speakers
AE

Aimee E. Huard

Chair and Professor of Social Science, Great Bay Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Aimee E. Huard earned her PhD. in Anthropology from the Binghamton University, SUNY. She is the Department Chair of Social Sciences for Great Bay Community College and the Chair of the CCSNH IRB. Working with a team of instructors in the social... Read More →
SR

Stephanie Roper

Program Coordinator, History/Political Science, Nashua Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Stephanie Roper has a PhD. in History from the University of Kansas. She is the program coordinator for History and Political Science for Nashua Community College and an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Humanities for the Community College System... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room E-258, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

M-108: Theatre Arts Technique and Professional Skills Building: A New Hybrid Course
Limited Capacity seats available

For the past ten years, the Theatre Arts faculty at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) has accompanied 15 to 20 students to the annual Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF).  KCACTF, the only student conference of its kind, celebrates excellence in college theatre.  Students attend KCACTF in order to enroll in specialized classes offered by leaders in the industry, present research papers, dramatic scenes, and selections from musical theatre; students also have the opportunity to participate in various technical and administrative festival internships.

As a means to prepare students to participate in KCACTF, KCC theatre faculty designed a special upper-level course entitled Advanced Theatre Practicum.  Through studio-style instruction, reflective writing exercises, and rigorous independent research and rehearsal, Advanced Theatre Practicum prepares students for a productive conference experience.  What KCC students and faculty have learned through this experience, is that in addition to conference preparation, Advanced Theatre Practicum exposes Theatre Arts Majors to best practices in the applied theatre arts, and readies students for the successful transfer to competitive BA Theatre Arts programs and BFA conservatories.

Through an in-depth presentation of the KCC Theatre Arts Program Advanced Theatre Practicum curriculum, and through the showcasing of student research and success, this workshop will offer participants tools on how to create a performing arts course that offers a hybrid of arts training and professional skills building.   


Speakers
avatar for Ryan McKinney

Ryan McKinney

Director of Theatre Arts, Kingsborough Community College
RYAN McKINNEY is an Associate Professor of Theatre Arts & Director of the Theatre Arts Program for the City University of New York at Kingsborough Community College. He has previously served on the faculties of San Diego State University, Pace University, Marymount Manhattan College... Read More →
avatar for Paul Ricciardi

Paul Ricciardi

Kingsborough Community College/City University of New York
Paul is an Associate Professor of Theatre Arts at Kingsborough Community College. He is also Director of the Ancram Opera House in the Hudson Valley of New York where he curates REAL PEOPLE REAL STORIES, a community-based story telling program. Paul is a Designated Linklater Voice... Read More →
avatar for Thomas L. Rothacker

Thomas L. Rothacker

Sub Asst. Professor of Theatre Arts, Kingsborough Community College / KCACTF Region 1 Chair of Irene Ryans


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room M-108, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

M-107: Articulating the Discord: How San Diego’s PATH is attempting to de-instrumentalize education
Limited Capacity seats available

San Diego PATH was implemented with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to address the shifting landscape of higher education and the value of studying the humanities to students in all fields - specifically because the arts and humanities engage us in conversations about social issues regarding race/ethnicity, gender, immigration, technology, poverty, and the environment that demand our attention. The goal is to increase transfer and continuity for students from the local San Diego Community Colleges who apply to the University of California San Diego choosing a humanities major. Our collaboration has become an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to share best practices, discuss pedagogy, and explore the role of technology in shaping education and research in the 21st century. We would like to share successes and challenges we have faced as we explore new ways to increase collaboration between 4-year and 2-year colleges, including a mentorship program that pairs graduate students with faculty at the community colleges, a cohort exploring the depth of the digital humanities, and a conference focused on ways to reclaim the vital role of education as necessary for developing critical, global citizens, rather than a tool aimed at attaining a job post-graduation.

Speakers
CC

Carmen Carrasquillo

Professor, San Diego Community College District
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: An advocate for an emancipatory approach to education, Carmen writes about ways colleges can transform education settings into places of true engagement and inclusion. Her research places student voice at the center and examines how disadvantaged... Read More →
KC

Kelly Clemen

Student, UCSD
JD

Jennifer Derilo

Assistant Professor of English, San Diego Mesa College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Jennifer Derilo teaches composition, literature, and creative writing at San Diego Mesa College. She earned her MFA at Mills College with an emphasis on creative nonfiction. Jennifer serves on the board of directors for the literary nonprofit... Read More →
RA

Rodrigo Antonio Gomez

Assistant Professor of English, San Diego Miramar College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Rodrigo is a professor of English at San Diego Miramar College, where he teaches literature and composition. He took his M.A. in Rhetoric from Cal Poly
avatar for Laura Martin

Laura Martin

Sr. Program Manager, UCSD
Preferred Gender Pronouns: anyBio: Laura Martin is Sr. Program Manager in the Division of Arts andHumanities at UC San Diego. She has ten years of service at UC San Diego where she has extensive experience in program management, international conference planning, financial analysis... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room M-107, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

11:30am

Transfer Panel of Community College Alumni
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
RG

Raven Gomez

Student/ HASTAC Student Coordinator, HASTAC/ The Futures Initiative
IT

Ivan Taurisano

ivantaurisano93@gmail.com


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room E-113/E-111A 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

11:30am

E-266: Humanities For All: Guided Pathways, Authentic Assessment & Liberal Education in Community Colleges
Limited Capacity seats available

To engage the most community college students with humanities learning, we need to reach beyond humanities majors to find ways to integrate humanities and liberal education into general education and other majors, including professional programs. At LaGuardia and Guttman Community Colleges, we affirm this principal with teaching, learning and assessment focused on college-wide Core Competencies that embody powerful aspects of humanities ways of thinking. As faculty build these Competencies into CUNY’s Pathways Core AND the curriculum of every major, they build a clear and accessible path to graduation. Strengthening curricular cohesion in every academic and professional program, this approach engages all students with the concepts and questions of liberal education, and builds the 21st century learning capacities that students need for success in education and career. Our session thus illuminates an innovative community college strategy for expanding the reach of humanities learning.

For our presentation, we’ll discuss how each of our institutions have
• Created Humanities-centered curriculum frameworks;
• Incorporated assignment design into authentic assessment;
• Improved access to Humanities education for all.

LaGuardia will highlight our Occupational Therapy and Natural Sciences programs. Guttman will present a brief overview of each of their five programs of study – Liberal Arts and Sciences, Human Services, Information Technology, and Business Administration.

Speakers
DB

Dr. Bret Eynon

Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
DL

Dr. Laura M. Gambino

Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
RL

Regina Lehman

Associate Professor, OTA Program Director, Faculty Co-Director of Assessment and Institutional Learning, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: anyBio:
DP

Dr. Preethi Radhakrishnan

Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:
JR

Justin Rogers-Cooper

Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns:Bio:


Friday October 19, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
LaGuardia, Room E-266, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

12:00pm

Atrium: Modern Language Association Information Table
Staff from the MLA International Bibliography, Scholarly Communications, and Programs will be present to provide information. 

Friday October 19, 2018 12:00pm - 2:00pm
LaGuardia Atrium, E Building 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

12:30pm

Atrium: American Council of Learned Societies Information Table
Learn about research funding opportunities for community college faculty with ACLS director of fellowship programs Matthew Goldfeder. Please come ask questions!

Speakers
MG

Matthew Goldfeder

Director of Fellowship Programs, American Council of Learned Societies
Wish to know more about ACLS's Community College Faculty Fellowships; to volunteer to serve as a peer reviewer; other opportunities for research funding; or about the humanities in higher education? Please come ask me.


Friday October 19, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
LaGuardia Atrium, E Building 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

12:30pm

Atrium: Lunch - Open Tables
Friday October 19, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
LaGuardia Atrium, E Building 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

12:30pm

Poolside Room: Lunch - Conversation Tables
Friday October 19, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
LaGuardia Poolside Room, E Building 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

1:30pm

Special Free Preview of Scenes of ELECTRA by LaGuardia Theater Department
The LaGuardia Theatre program is preparing a new adaptation of classic greek tragedy, ELECTRA, written by Sophocles. They will perform excerpts from the play. Then, Stefanie Sertich will discuss the process of adapting the play, and the student performers will discuss their experience of bringing it to life on stage. 

Speakers
avatar for Stefanie Sertich

Stefanie Sertich

Professor, LaGuardia Community College



Friday October 19, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
LaGuardia Main Stage, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

2:30pm

Break
Friday October 19, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
LaGuardia Community College, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

M-108: From Diversity to Inclusion: Staff and Faculty Share Experiences and Best Practices
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is a roundtable that seeks to answer the question, what does “inclusion” (as opposed to “diversity”) look like when practiced by LaGuardia’s staff and faculty? How do we go from diversity in theory to inclusion in practice in the work that we do? What are proven, effective strategies that we can share to improve the experiences between colleagues, as well as the experiences of the students we serve?

To address this, faculty and staff participants will share successes and challenges they have experienced with regard to inclusion, as well as opportunities they see in their respective positions on campus to effect change. Followed by a Q&A, the roundtable (20-25 mins) will emphasize the following:
  • Reflections of challenges with diversity and inclusion in the workplace;
  • Strategies for creating inclusive classrooms, events, and spaces for students;
  • Effective practices of inclusion within institutional settings.
Participants also seek to preview and promote FSOC’s upcoming efforts to collect data and coordinate events around inclusion, ultimately continuing the Opening Sessions theme over the course of the academic year.

Speakers
VB

Vanessa Bing

LaGuardia CC
HF

Hugo Fernandez

Associate Professor, LaGuardia CC
JH

Jason Hendrickson

Assist, CUNY - LaGuardia CC
FK

Florence Kabba

LaGuardia CC
WN

Wendy Nicholson

LaGuardia CC


Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room M-108, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

E-129: What Higher Education Instructors can Learn from Self-directed and Facilitated Learning Practices + The Promise and Threat of a Liberatory Pedagogy: Teaching African American Literature after Charlottesville
Limited Capacity filling up

This session explores how self-directed learning and facilitation practices in a democratic, progressive school can be applied to higher education settings. The session explores norms of traditional learning and contrasts these against other possibilities based on the panelists' training, observations, and applications drawn from organizations dedicated to self-directed learning.

In "Teaching to Transgress," bell hooks offers a revolutionary critique of passive modes of teaching which remains particularly relevant to the increasingly instrumentalized approaches to education that persist within community colleges today. hooks emphasizes the importance of encouraging students to challenge authority, to become active agents in the construction of knowledge, so that they may become fully actualized participants in a democratic society. However, this emphasis on transgression of hierarchies in the classroom, particularly within the historically left-leaning field of the humanities, has grown problematic as white supremacist ideologies have grown increasingly normalized. Due to the unique populations that they serve, community college instructors are often faced with the challenge of teaching a more ideologically and racially diverse population of students than instructors at so-called traditional colleges. At a time when challenging extremist ideologies might make one vulnerable to professional or even physical abuse, how can humanities instructors maintain a commitment to teaching inconvenient “truths” while also seeking to engage each student, regardless of political outlook, with a liberatory pedagogy? This presentation argues that a renewed focus on primary texts and a decentering of pedagogical authority remains crucial to maintaining such a commitment.

Speakers
KK

Katherine K. Chen

Associate Professor, City College of New York and Graduate Center, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Katherine Chen is an award-winning organizational researcher and a sociology professor at The City College of New York and Graduate Center, CUNY. Her areas of expertise include organizations, economic sociology, and ethnography. Her most research... Read More →
avatar for Brian Nail

Brian Nail

Professor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Preferred Gender Pronouns: he/himBio: Dr. Brian Nail is a Professor of English at Florida State College at Jacksonville. Jacksonville has a rich but under-acknowleged African American literary and artistic culture. And like other cities in the South, it also has a continuing legacy... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Vinculado

Kristen Vinculado

Undergraduate, The City College of New York, CUNY
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Kristen Vinculado is a undergraduate majoring in sustainable social development through the CUNY BA program. In regards to pedagogy, Kristen attended a progressive K-8 school and a traditional high school, experiencing two contrasting educational... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room E-129, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

E-150: Breaking Academic & Student Silos: Connecting Arts, Humanities and Journalism
Limited Capacity seats available

Humanities’ role in higher education, in the classroom and beyond, will be explored. Breaking academic and student silos is critical in a time when as Thomas Friedman, the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist responded (loosely quoted from a TV interview), “Young people need to learn how to learn,” in response to a concerned parent’s question: “What do you recommend young students study in our rapidly changing world?”

The connections of arts and journalism to the humanities is abundantly clear based on Stanford University’s definition: “The humanities can be described as the study of how people process and document the human experience.” Elements of the arts, such as performance and literature, serve as a lens into the human condition. By understanding how aesthetics affect individuals, one can grasp the importance of the arts and how they enrich one’s life. Each panelist will explain a philosophy and practice of increasing student engagement with the “Humanities.” Both academic and student silos need disruption for students to lead fulfilling lives in an ever-challenging world, and to have meaningful roles in a constantly evolving society.

Two presenters connect arts and humanities, as disrupting academic silos. The third presenter connects journalism and the humanities, as disrupting the student silo.

Speakers
VC

Viridiana Coyt

Community College Student, Westchester Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Viridiana Coyt is a "DACA" community college student who studied Journalism. A 2017 Pulitzer Center Fellow. She was also Co-Editor-in-Chief of The Viking News (Westchester Community College newspaper).
CK

Cherise Klebanov

Director of Art Gallery/Educational Center, Nu|Garde LLC.
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: As an art historian/lecturer who presents workshops and conducts art tours, Ms. Klebanov focuses on critical "seeing" and its relationship to critical thinking by using visual arts in the broader context of the humanities.
PR

Paula Rubenstein

Coordinator of Cultural Affairs/ Adjunct Professor of English, Westchester Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Dr. Paula Rubenstein is the Coordinator of Cultural Affairs and Adjunct Professor of English at Westchester Community College. In these dual roles she has used the arts and humanities in her curriculum.


Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room E-150, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

E-258: Slow Looking' as Inclusive Pedagogy + The Study of Hip-Hop Literature In Community College English Courses
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop examines how 'slow looking' exercises, both in and outside the classroom, utilize site-specific learning environments to appeal to a wide range of learners and thinkers of different backgrounds and capabilities. Drawing upon recent publications such as Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber's 'The Slow Professor,' as well as the popular slow-food movement which addresses the ethics of food production, the 'Slow Looking' exercise I have developed for my classroom asks students to find a piece of art in an original setting, turn off their phones, and examine it carefully. The exercise is not about the content of the art per se, but about the students' encounter with art and their own mental processes as they engage with it. As such, 'slow looking' assignments such as these can be an effective way to tap into students' innate interests and backgrounds while demanding little from them in terms of prior knowledge or educational history. Activities like this one, which demand deep engagement and concentrate on process and tempo rather than material and rote thinking, help students take ownership over their fields of study, and branch into discussions about empathy, difference, our reliance on technology, and vulnerable encounters with the unfamiliar.
+
Hip Hop is a form of music that is not only favored by many students, especially students of color, at the community college level, but one that they relate to and identify with. Because many of them are well-informed in this genre, it is a topic of great interest in class. Students in community college English/literature courses are amazed when they are shown strong connections between Hip Hop and literature. Thus, in this presentation, participants will see how the study of Hip Hop lyrics and artists can supplement and inform other literary genres including Shakespearean plays, and literature including British, American, Contemporary, and Comparative. This presentation will include examples of sample assignments, in-class activities, and projects that have successfully lured students into the study of literature. The goal of this presentation is to show all faculty that students, especially those at the Basic Skills levels, find value, importance, and confidence in the study of literature when coupled with Hip Hop. Also, the goal is to show faculty that their students can gain more than just an education in literature, but also in History, Psychology, Sociology, and even Mathematics with Hip Hop integrated into their curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Boyda Johnstone

Boyda Johnstone

Assistant Professor, Borough of Manhattan Community College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Boyda Johnstone is a current Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at Fordham University in New York who will be joining the Department of English at Borough of Manhattan Community College in Fall 2018 as Assistant Professor. She is well-versed in the... Read More →
avatar for Pegah Motaleb

Pegah Motaleb

Associate Professor- English, San Diego Mesa College
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/herBio: Pegah Motaleb is a professor of English at San Diego Mesa College, the Co-Coordinator of the Honors program, and the Co-Coordinator of the Preparing Accomplished Transfers in the Humanities (PATH) program in the San Diego Community College district... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room E-258, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

M-107: Faculty to Faculty: Building Pathways and Partnership between the Community College System and the University in New Hampshire
Limited Capacity seats available

In New Hampshire, the public community college and university systems have historically had little to do with each other. In the past decade, and especially the past year, this has begun to change. In this session, we describe our efficient, successful method for developing program pathways and articulations between the University of New Hampshire and the Community College System of New Hampshire. Rather than establishing articulations through legislative fiat, an approach that can leave students prepared to transfer on paper but woefully underprepared in practice, faculty from each institution came together to co-author shared academic standards to great effect, as we are already launching full 2+2, 8-semester program maps in various majors, helping students make as seamless a transition from community college to university as possible. An added benefit of the shared effort is the building of relationships of trust and understanding between faculty that will sustain and deepen our institutional partnerships over time. This work is supported by the Mellon Foundation, which awarded the Community College System of New Hampshire and the University of New Hampshire a grant to establish the New Hampshire Humanities Collaborative. This is the first grant the Foundation has made to a community college system.

Speakers
CA

Charles Ansell

Chief Operating Officer, CCSNH
Preferred Gender Pronouns: He/him Bio: Charles Ansell is the Chief Operating Officer of the Community College System of New Hampshire. Based in Concord, New Hampshire, Charles works to strengthen academic operations and strategy throughout the seven-college system and acts as Project... Read More →
LB

Leslie Barber

Mellon Faculty Fellow and Professor of Biology, Community College System of NH
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/her Bio: Leslie Barber is a Professor of Biology at Great Bay Community College and Faculty Fellow on the New Hampshire Humanities Collaborative. Having coordinated efforts to establish program articulations between the Community College System of NH... Read More →
avatar for Paul Robertson

Paul Robertson

Lecturer - Classics & Humanities, University of New Hampshire
Grant writing/fundingCommunity College - University articulations, transfers, pathwaysPedagogy: digital, adult, liberal arts, etc.



Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room M-107, M Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

3:00pm

E-266: The New Hampshire Humanities Collaborative: Working Together to Address Grand Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

Our session highlights how students and faculty can communicate the value of the humanities in community college/university collaborations and to audiences beyond campus. We will focus on the deep humanities collaboration in New Hampshire between the seven college Community System of New Hampshire (CCSNH) and the College of Liberal Arts at the University of New Hampshire. The NH Humanities Collaborative (NHHC), generously funded by the Mellon Foundation, will be in its third year in Fall 2018. The NHHC is a comprehensive state-wide approach to higher education humanities engagement, with faculty members at NH╒s colleges working together creatively to demonstrate how the humanities can inform discussion and deepen engagement in addressing grand challenges in the state and society. Our project shows how enriched curriculum and intentional pathways in the humanities at NH╒s community colleges can benefit students and the communities served by our colleges, including better enabling and supporting transfer to university humanities programs. Significant progress to date includes public humanities events with participation by community college and UNH faculty, students and community members; course equivalencies established; and deep faculty collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Ross Gittell

Ross Gittell

Chancellor, Community College System of NH
ABOUTPreferred Gender Pronouns: He/himBio: Dr. Ross Gittell is well-known in economic and policy circles as an authority for economic analysis and forecasting. Prior to his appointment as Chancellor at CCSNH, he was the James R. Carter Professor at the Whittemore School of Business... Read More →


Friday October 19, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
LaGuardia, Room E-266, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

4:00pm

Break
Friday October 19, 2018 4:00pm - 4:15pm
LaGuardia Community College, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA

4:15pm

E-242: What We Learned: Participatory Reflection
We're all attending different sessions during the day. This is an opportunity for us to come together and share our biggest insights from the day with moderators.

Friday October 19, 2018 4:15pm - 5:15pm
LaGuardia, Room E-242, E Building 30-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City, NY, USA

5:15pm

Break
Friday October 19, 2018 5:15pm - 5:30pm

5:30pm

Keynote: Saeed Jones
Saeed Jones is a powerful voice in the world of literary activism and his writing often takes on questions of identity. As the executive editor of culture at BuzzFeed, he has shaped his platform into a tool for social awareness.

Saeed Jones was born in Memphis, Tennessee, and grew up in Lewisville, Texas. His debut collection, Prelude to Bruise, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and was awarded the 2015 PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry. The collection also received a starred review in Publishers Weekly, which described the book as, “a fever dream, something akin to magic.” His poems engage themes of intimacy, race and power, and often incorporate elements of mythology. In a 2014 interview for PEN America, Jones stated, “I’m obsessed with manhood as a brutal and artful performance. My mind always finds its way back to the crossroad where sex, race, and power collide. Journeys, transformation as well as dashed attempts to transform, fascinate me as well.”

Jones has received a Pushcart Prize and fellowships from Cave Canem and Queer Art Mentorship. He lives in New York City where he’s working on his memoir, How We Fight For Their Lives. Set to release in the spring of 2018, the memoir captures Saeed’s experience growing up as a queer, black male in southern America.

Friday October 19, 2018 5:30pm - 6:30pm
LaGuardia Main Stage, E Building 31-10 Thomson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA